Deja vu

Windows 10: Stranger than fiction.

 

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219 responses to “Deja vu

  1. In that case Monco was arguing for the Red hat “malware” behavior, fanbot.

    That was his argument in the Windows temp dir argument, too. The argument started out something like “temp is one of the main vectors for malware for unprivileged users so purging it can remove malware” and then Monco said “no wait you might need that malware”.

    some idiot 3rd party app might expect to store files in temp

    As I recall it was demanded such an example be produced but there was nothing but crickets and tumbleweed.

  2. That Exploit Guy

    I get the Monco hate after he’s raped you so many times, but there is no reason to be an idiot when arguing with him.

    You realise whoever wrote that was probably just making things up like last time they asserted that “Monco” “threw a tantrum about Windows 7 in LHB” despite there was (as evidence showed) nothing of the sort going on (instead, there was an argument about Java).

    Of course, there was also the possibility that they just confused everyone arguing with them with “Monco”, because, you know, they believe so much their position is the default that they cannot accept even the mere suggestion that it might be the fanatical fringe and have to invent a bogeyman to “rationalise” the opposition.

    Red Hat based shit doesn’t by default and they’ll argue non-stop that is the correct behavior because everything Debian does is wrong even when it results in malware installed and running in /tmp.

    This is actually rather interesting given that in Unix-like systems, /tmp is a globally “executable” directory that everyone can write to. This would be akin to Windows allowing “Everyone” to write to \Program Files and set permissions for the child objects created. Of course, there is the ramification that malware might persist and create other non-specific security threats after a reboot, but what’s more obvious is that this is essentially a loophole for unauthorised applications and files to be run and distributed on a shared machine (e.g. a kiosk). The Windows way of solving this problem is to simply block all users from accessing \Windows\Temp and put user-specific temporary files in respective user profiles (i.e. %LOCALAPPDATA%\temp), but I guess the Unix world as a whole will still need some time to realise this, backtrack, put an end to the practice of globally writable directories and then declare how much “Unix” is way ahead of Windows in the area.

  3. That Exploit Guy

    The Windows Temp folder in App Data gets fatter and fatter, because of all those apps that store temporary files that aren’t.

    Usually, Disk Cleanup (or “cleanmgr.exe”) is adequate for the job and conservative enough to minimise impact on system reliability. The tool also provides you with a documented way to run with preset preferences using the /sageset:… and /sagerun:… flags, which is convenient for when you want to put it on a schedule.

    If you want to simply satisfy your obsessive-compulsiveness, though, here’s what you can do:

    1) cd to %Windir%\Temp in an elevated command prompt.

    2) Run del /q * to remove all files that are not currently locked.

    3) Run for /d in (*) do (rd /s /q "%d") to remove all subdirectories that are not currently locked and contain no locked files.

    4) Repeat the same steps for %LOCALAPPDATA%\Temp and other directories you want to purge.

    If you want to run the commands on a schedule, simply put them in a .cmd file and then set up a new item in Task Scheduler accordingly.

    By the way, if you prefer CCleaner or something similar, that’s your call, but, as far as I can see, this all simply comes down to personal preferences, and if I can get away without using a third-party tool, then I don’t see why I should use it.

  4. That Exploit Guy

    Correction:

    In step 3, the command should have a %d following /d. In other words, it should read for /d %d in (*) do (rd /s /q "%d") instead of for /d in (*) ....

  5. That Gzip Guy

    I get the Monco hatafr ’s raped you smany times, burinan tbidiowarguing wi h.

    You realise whoeverrotthatas pbably just making thup liklastimerted “Monco” “w aantrum abWdows 7 LHBdespi(evisw) nhofso god, arge Java).

  6. Satya Nadella

    I love $ Linux and I am a stupid Indian head

  7. Of course, there was also the possibility that they just confused everyone arguing with them with “Monco”

    Why is “Monco” is quotation marks?

  8. Dang, the Monco fanbot again.
    Long time no see.

    You are losing because you are an angry Loonix luser

    In that case Monco was arguing for the Red hat “malware” behavior, fanbot.
    Shut up you are just jealous Windows has the best security and you can not afford because you are a stupid Indian immigrant. I SHALL DEPORT YOU

  9. As usual, every time a Bitcoin “exchange” gets hacked or merely faces a hiccup, the price of the “coin” crashes.

    cryptocoinsnews(dot)com/bitcoins-price-plummets-125k-bitcoins-may-stolen-bitfinex/

    Believe it or not, there are people who believe Bitcoin makes a viable trade medium, aka they believe goods can be priced in Bitcoins, apparently oblivious to the fact that major retailers are making a promise to keep prices stable for an X amount of weeks barring wars and such, and hence thinly-traded currencies which face major swings during the span of a couple of days don’t fit the bill. Even if a store “accepts” bitcoin, in reality, the price is tied to a (mostly) stable dollar amount.

    Trading in Bitcoin doesn’t make any more sense than trading in penny stocks.

    Now, the question is: Should you buy Bitcoin now that is low? I mean, on one hand it is Bitcoin we are talking about, on the other hand there is genuine demand for the product from the world’s criminals, so it should bounce up again, right? Decisions, decisions…

  10. BTW, today was Anniversary update day. So far, I ‘ve noticed my touchpad settings have been reset (I think this is some kind of law since it has happened on every major update) and the Intel GPU driver was rolled back to some ancient one (but managed to find a better one in Windows Update). No reset file associations (wow! progresss).

    Also, ‘ve noticed that after the update, the notifications stay on the bottom right, instead of disappearing after some seconds. Which means that they are now (wait for it)… just like the notification ballons we had in Windows 7. Funny how after Windows 8, all the UI progress made ever since has been either aesthetic changes on the login screen or gradually restoring the ergonomics of Windows 7.

    The whole “disappearing notifications” deal made no sense anyways. Smartphones make the notifications disappear and hide them in a drawer because they have small screen space. In a desktop system, the notifications can stay in the bottom right for as long as it wants, it’s not bothering anyone

    PPS: A Windows.old folder that is 24.7GB big. I wonder if this happens in Surface devices too. If it does, it is the first mobile-hostile supposedly mobile-first OS


    Should I nuke this folder? Because it contains the old AppData folder…

  11. major retailers are making a promise to keep prices stable for an X amount of weeks
    This practice is rampant in the US but I had the impression it was illegal or socially resisted elsewhere. In any case, that’s hardly even relevant given that consumers themselves, as a whole, can’t stomach risk and don’t want an unstable currency. Compared to a major currency, Bitcoin is microscopic. It’d probably take another 50 years for it to become another US dollar, Euro, Yen, British Pound, etc. As it is, a single entity can easily disrupt the entire Bitcoin market because it is small enough where such a thing is possible. With an established currency, it’d take one of the world’s largest banks melting down or government shutdown to affect that sort of chaos.

    Trading in Bitcoin doesn’t make any more sense than trading in penny stocks.
    I know people who are still mining and think I’m crazy for not doing it, even though the handful of “bits” they mine on a daily basis cost more than the electricity to power their 650 watt miners. I tell them you needed a crystal ball in 2009 and that by the time they first heard about Bitcoin in mainstream news it was already too late. They aren’t making money. At best they’ve broken even over a period of years. I told them the only way to make money at it anymore is to ignore mining and try to time the market, which is basically the penny stock argument. Bitcoin miners are like video poker or blackjack at a casino: a safe, reliable, predictable method to slowly bleed money.

    Should you buy Bitcoin now that is low?
    Well, since you’re asking and don’t seem to have a specific plan, probably not. While a big drop from ~$650, the current price of ~$540 isn’t exactly low. It’s the same price as two months ago. If anything, it’s a predictable correction to the run up in June, regardless of any particulars. Bitcoin has been down into the low $200s within the past 52 weeks. After the February 2014 MtGox meltdown Bitcoin steadily lost value (smoothing out peaks and valleys) for about 20 months before finally bottoming out about a year ago before finally steadily rebounding. Personally, I’d expect another market malaise at this point rather than continued growth.

  12. Should I nuke this folder? Because it contains the old AppData folder…
    Don’t you have an external drive or something? I always put that sort of stuff in a holding cell.

  13. . Compared to a major currency, Bitcoin is microscopic.

    And it will stay so. You see, a funny thing with Bitcoin is that it is capped to a worldwide total of 7 transactions per second ( https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Scalability ), I am talking verified transactions because you can’t be sure you ‘ve paid for sure unless you see the transaction in the chain with another block after it. Even if they get it around 70 transactions per second, it’s laughably low since Paypal alone processes over 100. Even today, with Bitcoin being used mostly to buy drugs and guns without having to go to the bad part of the city, confirmation times can be as high as an hour. Good for online orders, bad for retail or for buying apps from app stores. RationalWiki has a good write-up on Bitcoin, much more informative than all the tech-talk about messing with the padding data of a block to see if it will match an arbitrary hash you get from other sites, which concentrate on the blockchain technology but fails to analyse bitcoin as a transaction medium.

    It’d probably take another 50 years for it to become another US dollar, Euro, Yen, British Pound, etc.

    Haha, not a chance in hell. Such crypto-currencies are volatile by default, with all the “exchange” shops being unregulated (leading to embarrassing hacks like the one I linked above, which btw may be inside jobs), overall security being crap with no ability to recover a wallet if it’s lost, and the fact the “difficulty factor” is a built-in volatility mechanism because as the difficulty factor increases, transactions become slow to be validated, which leads to more people using traditional currencies and the value falls (assuming it has gained mainstream acceptance first). Then the difficulty factor decreases etc.

    Basically, the libertarians pushing for cryptocurrencies dream of a future with multiple cryptocurrencies, with every single one of us being gamblers-in-denial like them and selling and buying “coins” every day. Much like the linux loons dreamed of a future where all users where people would paste bash commands and fix x.org manually to make their computers work…

  14. where all users where = where all users

  15. RationalWiki has a good write-up
    I’ll take your word for it but this sounds impossible.

    all the “exchange” shops being unregulated
    This wouldn’t be the case 50 years down the road. Regulation would be introduced along the time. The public would demand it. At the very minimum there would be virtual vaults for cryptocurrency under control by government entities and large banks. Treasuries, basically. The end result probably wouldn’t be much different than what we have now.

    may be inside jobs
    They always are. MtGox were crooks, too.

  16. That Exploit Guy

    As usual, every time a Bitcoin “exchange” gets hacked or merely faces a hiccup, the price of the “coin” crashes.

    That’s a simple reflection of how easy the market loses confidence in the so-called “currency”. As many, many people have already pointed out, Bitcoin is nothing more than a relearning experience of all the lessons as gone through by the financial sector in the past 100 years. All the jokes that can be made about it has already been made, and if its proponents still insist on pushing their mathematical Beanie Babies as a viable means of settling debts (it’s not), then that’s their own time and resources to waste.

  17. That Exploit Guy

    Funny how after Windows 8, all the UI progress made ever since has been either aesthetic changes on the login screen or gradually restoring the ergonomics of Windows 7.

    Have you spent at least a bit of time looking back at Windows 7 before making this comment? The Start screen/menu is still the same one UI design geniuses on the Internet insisted on pushing as an alternative when Windows 8 came out, Windows Explorer still sports the ribbon interface, the Settings interface is still the same uncluttered one as featured in Build 10240 (albeit with a added search box), and swiping the right side of the the screen still gives you the same old Action Centre Windows 10 has always had since Day 1. If there has been any moving backwards to Windows 7, it has already been done since Windows 10 going RTM.

    Also, let’s face it – Universal apps are usually written with specific aspect ratios and display modes in mind (to suit readability with respect the flow of content, usability with respect to Fitts’s Law, etc.), and despite the introduction of the windowed mode, anyone having spent an appreciable amount of time using it will realise the only times the layouts of their applications make sense are when they are displayed full-screen rather than in an arbitrary-sized frame. In other words, Windows 10 is no more a case for ergonomics than people with severe cases of Dunning-Kruger overpowering sensible discussions in the design of a UI, but that’s the reality we live in at the moment (as we can see clearly even in this comment section).

    PPS: A Windows.old folder that is 24.7GB big. I wonder if this happens in Surface devices too. If it does, it is the first mobile-hostile supposedly mobile-first OS

    Two things:

    1) A Surface device these days would have at least 64GB of disk space (as oppose to the hilariously nostalgic 32GB that some enthusiasts insisted on having on their desktops when the first wave of SSDs came out) and, as it has always had, features an SD card slot (unlike, you know, the very user-respecting tablet known as “iPad”).

    2) The number as reported by Disk Cleanup is likely inaccurate (due to the presence of multiple hard links pointing to the same stream). I upgraded the Win10 install on my tablet (with a 128GB SSD) a hour or so ago, and despite the reported 20.7GB size for “Previous Windows Installation(s)”, the actual increase in disk usage is somewhere around 10GB.

    Should I nuke this folder? Because it contains the old AppData folder…

    As usual, take what you need and get rid of the rest. Seriously, why do I even need to tell you this?

  18. That Exploit Guy

    While a big drop from ~$650, the current price of ~$540 isn’t exactly low.

    The problem is not just the magnitude in the drop in price (~20% as reported by some), which is larger even than the recent ~12% price drop of the British pound, but also that this is largely in response to the latest Bitcoin exchange hack/scam (depending on the person you hear the story from), which should be far less significant to a major political/financial event of a developed nation with a 2.7 trillion US dollar GDP. This means, instead of holding on to so-called “currency” in this period of uncertainty, owners of Bitcoin are more prone to dumping it in a panic than speculators are willing to sell their Pound Sterling during Brexit. If you want a picture that perfectly encapsulates volatility as a phenomenon, this is it.

  19. ur wrong that exploit gay

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